Watch This Amazingly Clear Footage of Current NASA Spacewalks

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As of late NASA livestreams its spacewalks from exterior the Worldwide Area Station (ISS), providing of us the possibility to observe astronauts doing their job in one of many coolest workspaces ever.

The actual-time footage, nevertheless, can generally be a bit blurry or unstable, sometimes leaving viewers squinting as they attempt to work out precisely what they’re taking a look at.

Aiming to make amends, NASA has simply posted some pin-sharp spacewalk footage (prime) recorded utilizing high-definition cameras connected to astronauts’ spacesuits.

The standard is just unimaginable, providing area followers an in depth view of latest work performed exterior the ISS.

The footage options NASA astronauts Mike Hopkins, Victor Glover, and Kate Rubins, in addition to Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi, all of whom are at the moment aboard the area station (although as a consequence of go away quickly).

You’ll additionally see NASA astronauts Chris Cassidy and Bob Behnken, who collectively performed a complete of 4 spacewalks in the summertime of 2020.

Listed here are the particular timings for every of the astronauts who function within the video on the prime of this web page:

00:00​ – 00:53​:  January 27, 2021 – Mike Hopkins and Victor Glover

00:54​ – 2:13​: March 13, 2021 – Mike Hopkins and Victor Glover

2:13​ – 3:06​:  March 5, 2021 – Kate Rubins and Soichi Noguchi

3:06​ – 05:45:​ July 20, 2020 – Chris Cassidy and Bob Behnken

As of April 2021, there have been 237 spacewalks on the ISS. The walks often contain upkeep work or upgrades to the orbiting outpost, with each lasting between 5 and eight hours, relying on the character of the duty.

The primary individual to embark on a spacewalk was Russian cosmonaut Alexei Leonov. The outing passed off through the Voskhod 2 mission on March 18, 1965, and lasted round 10 minutes, with Leonov linked to his spacecraft by a 4.8-meter-long tether.

The primary American to go on a spacewalk was NASA astronaut Ed White. It passed off on June 3, 1965, through the Gemini 4 mission, and lasted about 23 minutes. As White floated in area greater than 100 miles above the Pacific Ocean , he radioed again to Mission Management in Houston: “That is the best expertise, it’s simply great. Proper now I’m standing on my head and I’m wanting proper down, and it seems to be like we’re arising on the coast of California. There’s completely no disorientation related to it.” He described ending the spacewalk because the saddest second of his life.

After you’ve watched NASA’s HD footage, take a look at this assortment of wonderful spacewalk images speaking over the a long time.

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